Search News:
News Room

Insidermedicine Launched - November 3, 2006

Have a new symptom like blurred vision or nagging shoulder pain? Odds are that you will log on and Google "blurred vision" or "shoulder pain". But can you trust the medical information that you get back? A recent research study conducted by the Pew Internet and American Life Project- a non-profit think thank- showed that while millions search for heath news, only 15% seek out the source and only 1 in 4 look at the date to see how current the material is. This could have major implications for one's health.

 

Insidermedicine Launched

Have a new symptom like blurred vision or nagging shoulder pain? Odds are that you will log on and Google "blurred vision" or "shoulder pain". But can you trust the medical information that you get back? A recent research study conducted by the Pew Internet and American Life Project- a non-profit think thank- showed that while millions search for heath news, only 15% seek out the source and only 1 in 4 look at the date to see how current the material is. This could have major implications for one's health.

A new service- started by a Queen’s University-affiliated husband and wife doctor team- aims to counteract this problem. Insidermedicine, a daily news show that is written, reported and produced by doctors, brings highly-credible breaking health information to patients. But don’t expect to see it on a major news network or cable TV. It is made for the web. And it is now reaching many thousands each and every day.

"We started the service because more and more patients were coming into our offices with information that they downloaded from the internet. The problem was that much of the information wasn’t correct. If people are attempting to make healthcare decision for themselves or their loved ones on incorrect information, it may affect their health," says Dr. Sanjay Sharma, the Chief Editor of Insidermedicine and an Associate Professor of Ophthalmology and Epidemiology at Queen's University.

"The concept really is one of better information," states Dr. Sharma. "Our concept was that we may be able to help patients by providing cutting edge information- to help them get 'inside medicine'. Hence the name 'insidermedicine'."

Each weekday, 4-8 videos are filmed to cover topics ranging from health promotion and disease prevention to breaking news pertaining to managing specific diseases like, heart disease, cancer and diabetes. While Insidermedicine first started with Sharma handling the camera and his wife, Dr. Susan Sharma a family physician who practices at Queen’s University- handling reporting duties, it has now grown significantly to involve a team of 15.

"Our goal is really to get information into patients hands at the same time that doctors are reading about it,” states Dr. Susan Sharma. “So on a daily basis, we have a team of doctors talking to researchers, talking to editors of the major scientific journals and attending medical conferences to create our breaking news stories. In the end we want to take evidence-based medicine directly to the patient."

Insidermedicine can be viewed each and every weekday at www.insidermedicine.ca in Canada and www.insidermedicine.com in the US.